Olivia Yancey

Olivia Yancey

Greetings! My name is Olivia Yancey. I am a certified Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (K-12) and I have been working at SESA for 5 years. I studied at Barton College and Vanderbilt University. At Barton College, I learned how to teach using total communication. At Vanderbilt University, I learned how to teach to listen and speak with and without their assistive listening devices (i.e., hearing aids and cochlear implants). Since graduation, I have worked with various students with communication modes including: American Sign Language/English, total communication, and listening and spoken language. My goal is to support Alaskan school teams provide students with hearing loss equal access to education and communication.

Kelsey Koenigs

Kelsey Koenigs

Hi! My name is Kelsey, this is my sign name. I am sharing this vlog with you so that you can learn a little more about who I am and what I do at SESA as a Deaf and Hard of Hearing education specialist. I am a certified Teacher of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, with a background in Bilingual-Bicultural education. I graduated from Boston University, four- thousand miles away from Alaska. My role is to provide consultation to education teams in rural Alaska that serve DHH students. I recommend resources and assessments that will equip the teams to better meet their students’ unique educational needs and provide opportunity to access communication successfully. You can contact me at any time via phone, video phone, or email. I look forward to meeting you, working with you, and seeing your DHH student succeed.
Events
2020 ALASKA EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETERS CONFERENCE

REFERRALS

Who is eligible for SESA’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing services?

  • ALL of the following must be true
  • Students from ages 3 to 22-years old.
  • Students enrolled in a public K-12 school.
  • The student has at least a 30 decibel bilateral hearing loss.
  • Live in rural areas that do not have access to a teacher of the deaf.
  • The student CAN have additional mild to severe disabilities.

What is SESA’s role in the educational team?

  • SESA’s services are provided at no cost to school districts.
  • SESA provides consultation to school districts.
  • Although we often interact with the student, we do not provide direct service to the student. We can’t be written into the Individual Education Plan (IEP) as a service provider.
  • We do not provide interpreter services.

How can SESA help?

  1. Visit the school to support the educational team.
  2. Assist in the development of the educational programs, assessment, assist in the development of appropriate educational goals for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing students.
  3. Arrange on-site visits based on site needs.
  4. Provide resources such as ASL videos and books.
  5. Train staff in educating a student with a hearing loss.

How do I refer a student?
You must have permission from the custodial parent(s) and the special education director.

You will need:

  1. The student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP)
  2. Evaluation Summary and Eligibility Report (ESSER)
  3. Medical records showing a hearing loss (look for an “audiogram” or “audiological report”)
  4. Referral Checklist
  5. District Referral Signature
  6. Mutual Exchange of Information (MEI)
Eligibility requirements for services are taken from the State of Alaska's Special Education Handbook. Children can qualify under either deafness or hearing impairment. To be eligible for special education and related services as a child with deafness, a child must:
  • Exhibit a hearing impairment that hinders the child's ability to process linguistic information through hearing, with or without amplification and that adversely affects educational performance; and
  • Require special facilities, equipment, or methods to make his or her educational program effective; and
  • Be diagnosed by a physician or audiologist as deaf; and
  • Be certified by a group consisting of qualified professionals and a parent of the child as qualifying for and needing special education services.
To be eligible for special education and related services as a child with a hearing impairment, a child must:
  • Exhibit a hearing impairment, whether permanent or fluctuating, that adversely affects educational performance but is not within the meaning of deaf; and
  • Require special facilities, equipment, or methods to make his or her educational program effective; and
  • Be diagnosed by a physician or audiologist as hard of hearing; and
  • Be certified by a group consisting of qualified professionals and a parent of the child as qualifying for and needing special education services.
Communication Modes

What is LSL? (Listening and Spoken Language)

What is TC? (Total Communication)

What is ASL? (American Sign Language)

What is BiBi? (Bilingual-Bicultural)
Staying Connected
Community and Life skills