New Materials

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For more information: Search the Library Catalog on the Web

Other lists of new materials are here.

New Library Materials for November 2019

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BRAILLE
808
Swenson
Tactile editing marks [kit] / by Anna Swenson. American Printing House for the Blind, Ã2015.
Description: “The writing process is an integral part of language arts instruction in many classrooms. From the early primary grades on, children learn about the stages of planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing that are so familiar to adult writers. Young student with visual impairments who use a braillewriter for writing often require additional support with revising and editing, which can be cumbersome on a brailler. The use of tactile editing marks, with assistance from the teacher as needed, provides these beginning writers with a concrete way to indicate changes on their braille drafts as they revised and edit short pieces. In addition, tactile editing marks enable them to write final correct copies of their work independently, just as their typically sighted peers do.”–page 3.

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BRAILLE
372.412
BOP
PreK
TchrKit
Building on patterns [braille] : the primary braille literacy program : pre-kindergarten : print kit / Eleanor Pester, project director. American Printing House for the Blind, 2018.
Description: Building on Patterns (BOP) Prekindergarten is the first level of the second edition of BOP. BOP is a systematic, comprehensive, and balanced literacy program designed to teach young children (through second grade) with visual impairments to read and write using braille. …reflects best practices in braille literacy instruction, with lessons designed to build literacy skills related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing in preparation for kindergarten. It may be used as a stand-alone program, or can also supplement regular preschool curricula. APH recommends that the print children’s books and their braille transcriptions in the Student Kit stay with the student after using them during lessons to help them begin (or supplement) their own library. The print and braille books can also be sent home so family members can have their own interactive reading sessions with their child.APH also highly recommends teachers use the electronic versions of the parent letters in order to tailor them to each student’s family. Note: the font for the braille with shadow dots used in the letters is available to download as well. Includes 28 instructional lessons, each paired with a children’s book and a tactile storybook that supports lesson concepts through activities that involve tracking, simple reading, and understanding tactile graphics. Each lessons begins with learning objectives, and then includes sections on the following: speaking and listening: interactive read-alouds using high-quality children’s literature with an emphasis on oral vocabulary and listening comprehension ; knowledge and concept development: days of the week, weather, shapes, and other concepts relevant to the preschool curriculum ; phonological/phonemic awareness: environmental sounds, rhyming words, syllables, and initial and ending sounds ; reading: tracking skills, letter and number recognition, phonics, and independent reading of simple continuous text (tactile storybooks) ; writing: practice exercises, modeled/interactive (shared) writing, and name writing ; a variety of tactile graphics ; enrichment activities incorporating poetry, arts and crafts, music, and movement.

November 7, 2019

New Library Materials for October 2019

New AARC Materials

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AI Reserve
616.85882
KitForKids
Kit for kids / Organization for Autism Research. Organization for Autism Research, Ã2004-2017.
Contents: 1 lesson plan + 1 how to use sheet + 1 information sheet + What’s up with Nick? booklets for students + 4 activity booklets + 1 poster. Access to online video for students.
Description: Peer training. “Despite the growing number of children with autism educated in mainstream classrooms, many students are not familiar with autism. A University of Georgia study (Campbell & Barger, 2010) found that only 46% of middle school students surveyed had heard of autism. Despite some recognition of the disability, they had little knowledge of its characteristics, such as communication and social skill challenges. If students are uninformed about a disability, they often attribute undesirable social behaviors to individual choice. For example, a classmate may interpret avoidance of eye contact as rude instead of as a behavioral characteristic of autism. Negative behaviors stem from this lack of understanding. A 2012 study by the Kennedy Krieger Institute found that 63% of children with autism surveyed had been bullied, compared to only 12% of these same children’s typically-developing siblings. The combination of more autism diagnoses, more children with autism accessing general education, and an explosion of bullying is creating a perfect storm in America’s classrooms. OAR’s Kit for Kids helps address these problems; educating children about autism will foster a greater understanding of the disability and its characteristics, as expressed in school settings. This improved knowledge will lead to a more compassionate and inclusive classroom environment.Our Kit for Kids program is designed to teach elementary and middle school students about their peers with autism. The kit is centered around an illustrated booklet entitled “What’s Up with Nick?”. This colorful, kid-friendly booklet tells the story about a new student, a boy with autism named Nick, through the eyes of a typical peer. The story teaches children that students with autism may think differently or need some accommodations, but all students are of equal worth and should be treated as such. You can use this program to increase awareness of autism among students from grades K-8. With greater knowledge of autism, our youth will learn to see the person first rather than focus on a classmate’s disability. By increasing students’ acceptance of differences, the Kit for Kids creates a more inclusive classroom and overall sense of community.”–publisher website.

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AI Reserve
371.90474
Finding
Finding your way : a college guide for students on the spectrum / Organization for Autism Research. Organization for Autism Research, 2018.
Description: “Everyone deserves a fulfilling college experience, including students on the autism spectrum. OAR’s Finding Your Way: A College Guide for Students on the Spectrum is intended to help students with ASD become better prepared for college life and academics. This guide addresses challenges that are both universal and unique to students on the college autism spectrum by providing information, guidance, and resources that address them. Finding Your Way offers practical advice from autism experts; powerful narratives from self-advocates; and relevant resource tools. It is intended to help readers anticipate and improve their academic and social situations by advocating for themselves. More specifically, this guide covers topics such as: transitions from high school to college ; self-advocacy and disclosure ; academic supports and accommodations ; strategies to establish and maintain daily routines and structure ; social relationships and conflict resolution ; jobs, internships, and financial aid.”–publisher’s website.

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AI Reserve
JUV
618.9285882
Autism
Autism my sibling, and me / […the product of hard work and creativity put in by Lauren Laverick-Brown and Jessie Stanek, OAR interns…] Organization for Autism Research, Inc, 2014.
Description: “Young children with siblings with autism are in a unique position. They face challenges (similar to those that parents encounter), but at a time before they’ve developed appropriate coping strategies. As a result, they need support to ensure that they’re informed, feel respected, and know how to be compassionate advocates for their brothers and sisters on the spectrum. … a fun and engaging workbook for children between the ages of 5 and 10. A host of colorful cartoon characters accompany these siblings as they learn about what autism means for their brother or sister – and handle potentially stressful issues. Through fun activities and supportive content, this resource also helps children work through many of the autism-related questions they may have.”–publisher website.

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AI Reserve
618.9285882
Life
Life as an autism sibling : a guide for teens / […the product of hard work and creativity put in by Lauren Laverick-Brown and Jessie Stanek, OAR interns…] Organization for Autism Research, Inc, 2014.
Description: “Siblings of children with autism are in a unique position. They face challenges (similar to those that parents encounter), but at a time before they’ve developed appropriate coping strategies. As a result, they need support to ensure that they’re informed, feel respected, and know how to be compassionate advocates for their brothers and sisters on the spectrum. … a handbook for teenage (and even pre-teen) siblings that offers guidance on how to productively address feelings and challenges that may arise as an autism sibling. The resource covers a variety of topics; from explaining autism to friends and peers, to coping with a family dynamic that’s different from what friends may experience. It also features testimonials from other teenage and young adult siblings who have “been there, done that.””–publisher website.

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AI Reserve
618.9285882
Brothers
Brothers, sisters, and autism : a parent’s guide to supporting siblings / […the product of hard work and creativity put in by Lauren Laverick-Brown and Jessie Stanek, OAR interns…] Organization for Autism Research, Inc, 2014.
Description: “Siblings of children with autism are in a unique position. They face challenges (similar to those that parents encounter), but at a time before they’ve developed appropriate coping strategies. As a result, they need support to ensure that they’re informed, feel respected, and know how to be compassionate advocates for their brothers and sisters on the spectrum…. addresses topics that range from dealing with perceived discrepancies in fairness to facilitating a positive relationship between siblings. The guide also includes testimonials from families with autism who deal with similar issues.”–publisher website.

New Equipment

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EQUIP
SS99
MistingFan
Misting fan [device]. Enabling Devices, [2019]
1 fan + 1 base + 1 USB cable + instructions.
Description: “Cool off and awaken the senses with our refreshing Misting Fan. Just activate your switch to feel a fine mist of water and a powerful breeze. Fan has three speeds and misting has two modes: continuous or intermittent. Two jacks enable users to activate the fan and mist functions separately using their own two switches. Three suction cups hold the fan in place. Comes with ¼-20 socket for mounting.”–website.

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EQUIP
T180
Rocktopus
Think and learn rocktopus, musical toy for preschoolers. Fisher Price, [2018]
Description: Think & Learn Rocktopus helps kids explore a variety of musical styles while learning about different instruments, rhythmic patterns, and more. Rocktopus comes with 15 musical instruments for preschoolers to mix (and remix) and let their creativity flow! Download the free Rocktopus app and let your mini-maestro create their own music videos with their new composing pal! Inspiring little learners to be big thinkers. Instruments & Facts: Rocktopus helps kids discover how different instruments sound, explore fun musical facts, and even lets them compose their own tunes! Rhythmic Patterns: When preschoolers create music with Rocktopus, they’re counting and creating patterns. Rocktopus teaches other math concepts too, like addition and subtraction. Attention & Listening Skills: Young “composers” follow directions from Rocktopus during fast-paced games that help develop attention skills.
Ages 3 to 6.

Small image of the toy.Chase me Casey™. VTech, 2017.
Description: Catch him if you can! Chase Me Casey™ is an adorable little monkey that skates, spins and wobbles across the floor, encouraging your little one to dance and crawl after him. When your child gets close, Casey reacts with playful sounds and silly and encouraging phrases. Five colorful shape buttons on the playful monkey’s shirt introduce letters, numbers, body parts, music and more. The chase is on! Monkey skates, spins, wiggles his arms and wobbles his head as he dances ; sensors trigger sounds and silly and encouraging phrases ; five colorful shape buttons ; two play modes: Catch Me Mode and Dancing Mode ; 70+ Songs, melodies, sounds & phrases. Developmental benefits: imitative play, language development, and cause and effect. Teaches letters, number, body parts, and gross motor skills.
Ages 9 to 36 months.

New Circles Program Materials

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AV
302.14
Circles
Level2
Circles [videorecording (DVD)] Intimacy & relationships : Level two, second step expanded introduction, special needs + / produced and directed by James Stanfield ; writen by James Stanfield, Dan Fouts. Revised edition. James Stanfield Pub. Co., 2007.
4 DVDs + 1 guide.
Description: “Helps your students to recognize exploitative relationships as well as develop mutually respectful ones. Designed to help your students “see” social and sexual distance. Explains the relationship between the level of intimacy between people and the way to touch, talk to and trust each other. Students will learn “relationship boundaries” and relationship specific behaviors, i.e., it’s okay to hug your mother; it’s not okay to hug the mailman. Demonstrates how intimacy levels change as relationships change. The role of mutual choice among individuals is emphasized, a critical concept for protecting students from exploitation. Presents to special students some extremely abstract concepts in a very simple and concrete manner. The connection between the kind of relationship and the corresponding level of intimacy is demonstrated visually, making learning this important content area easy for students”–Publisher’s web site.
NOTE: If you need the wall chart, personal charts, and icons, let the librarian know and we will send a separate kit.

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AV
302.14
Circles
StopAbuse
Circles [videorecording (DVD)] : stop abuse / Marklyn P. Champagne, Leslie Walker-Hirsch. James Stanfield & Co., c1986.
2 DVDs + 1 guidebook
Description: “Circles: Stop Abuse” helps workers teach persons with developmental disabilities how to recognize and avoid sexually threatening or abusive situations. Part I illustrates how to recognize and react to sexual exploitation occurring in close relationships with dates, close friends, and relatives, and teaches students that they don’t have to participate in physical contact that does not feel good to them. Part II illustrates the potential for abuse from adquaintances and strangers. Students learn how to identify inappropriate behaviour and initiate protective behaviour to cope with unwanted advances. Disc I, “The Circles Paradigm” is a highly abridged version of “Circles: Intimacy and Relationships, included in the kit to provide a quick overview of the Circles concept.
NOTE: If you need the wall chart, personal charts, and icons, let the librarian know and we will send a separate kit.

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AV
302.14
Circles
Materials
Circles program materials [wall chart]. James Stanfield & Co., c1986.
1 large wall chart + 1 tablet of small charts + cards and stickers.
Description: These materials are for use with Circles Level 2 : Intimacy and relationships, and with Circles : Stop Abuse.

New Braille Books

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BRAILLE
Winkler
Hooray! My butt left the bench! [braille] / Henry Winkler & Lin Oliver. Sponsored and presented by American Action Fund for Blind Children and Adults ; [Boston, MA] : Produced at National Braille Press, [2019?]
Description: Hank will need help from his father and friends if he is to help his second grade basketball team beat their arch rivals for the third year in a row.

New MD Materials

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MD Office
EQUIP
SW144
Hook+
Hook+ switch interface [device] / AbleNet. AbleNet Inc., [2018?].
Description: “Hook+ is an Apple MFi approved switch interface that provides a reliable wired connection to the iPad and iPhone via the Lightning connector. To get started, simply connect one to four switches to Hook+, turn Switch Control on, and connect Hook+ to your iPad or iPhone. Hook+ utilizes the Apple auto switch configurator and the first time Hook+ is used with an iPad or iPhone it will automatically configure the iPad or iPhone to use single switch auto scanning or dual switch step scanning based on how many switches are connected to Hook+. Once initially configured, switches can be manually re-configured to meet the needs of the user. The Apple auto switch configurator is only available on Apple MFi approved switch interfaces. Once Hook+ is connected and Switch Control is configured, you can do almost anything on an iPad or iPhone with a switch. Read an eBook, write an email, browse the internet, play games, control your home, and much more!” Compatibility: “Hook+ is not compatible with apps that use keystrokes for switch clicks. Hook+ uses Apple’s proprietary HID Assistive Switch Control protocol for switch clicks and is compatible with Switch Control found in iOS 8 or later. To access Switch Control, go to the Settings App > General > Accessibility > Switch Control. Hook+ is not compatible with iOS devices that use USB C.” Features: “Lightning connector provides a reliable wired connection ; utilizes Apple auto switch configurator ; Hook+ does not have an internal battery and can be used as long as the iPad or iPhone has a battery charge ; Hook+ App for firmware updates ; connect one to four individual switches via 3.5-mm/1/8-in switch jacks. With iOS 9, you are able to program two unique commands per switch for a total of eight different switch commands ; use the battery pass through on Hook+ to charge your iOS device while using Hook+” “Switch Control is an accessibility feature found in iOS 7 or later. Switch Control provides an on-screen interface that enables individuals with physical disabilities the ability to control almost any feature on their iPad or iPhone via one or multiple switches. Without having to physically touch the screen of their iPad or iPhone, an individual is able to use almost any feature on the iPad or iPhone by activating a switch. In addition, an individual can use a switch to activate Siri and use voice commands to control theiriPad or iPhone and home. To access Switch Control, on your iPad or iPhone, go to Settings App > General > Accessibility > Switch Control.” For iOS 7 or later.

October 23, 2019